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New Zealand Community Fault Model

Community Fault Model Map

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GNS has led a community-driven project that pools the collective knowledge of the earth science community to develop a fault model for New Zealand that is open, updatable and available to everyone.

What is the New Zealand Community Fault Model?

The New Zealand Community Fault Model (NZ CFM) is a two- and three-dimensional representation of active or potentially active fault zones. Each fault zone is associated with available movement and geometric information such as sense of slip, slip rake angle, slip rate, dip and maximum depth of faulting.

The model can be used or adapted for many scientific and practical uses including hazards related research and applications.

NZ Community Fault Model 

The two and three-dimensional models, associated data and a report detailing the compilation of the New Zealand Community Fault Model can be found here:

Who is involved in developing the NZ CFM?

We have brought together geologists and geophysicists from several disciplines and organisations to draw on this community’s wealth of knowledge. These scientists have helped define the model, including its limitations and uncertainties, to ensure it is fit-for-purpose for multiple applications.

A series of workshops were held in November 2020 to invite collaboration and input from the earth science community. These workshops helped incorporate additional geological fault knowledge and data important to a wide range of users.

We anticipate continual evolution of the NZ CFM as new data and knowledge becomes available. It is our expectation that progressively refined and updated versions of the NZ CFM will be developed, documented and released

How will the NZ CFM be used?

Our goal is to have all documented and peer-reviewed versions of the NZ CFM openly available online to anyone who may wish to use it (e.g. the earth science, engineering, seismic and insurance communities). This includes those who haven’t participated in its development. A link to the NZ CFM can be found above.

The uses of the NZ CFM are varied. We anticipate that subsequent versions of the model will contain multiple fault model representations and parameterisations with varying levels of detail. How this is done will be decided by the community involved.

Edgecumbe Fault rupture, 1987 Edgecumbe earthquake. Photo by Lloyd Homer, GNS Science.Caption: Edgecumbe Fault rupture, 1987 Edgecumbe earthquake. Photo by Lloyd Homer, GNS Science.

Edgecumbe Fault rupture, 1987 Edgecumbe earthquake. Photo by Lloyd Homer, GNS Science.

Potential research applications

Find out more  

Contact us by email if you would like to get involved in this CFM project, or just to find out more.