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Data from Kaikōura quake features in updated geological map of NZ - 06/11/2018

A wealth of geological information captured after the November 2016 Kaikōura earthquake is one of a number of additions and improvements in the newly updated 1:250,000 digital Geological Map of New Zealand.

The map is among the most used of GNS Science’s digital geological map products with 45,000 online views of it in the past year through GNS Science’s website. It covers the entire mainland of New Zealand, and a soon-to-be released addition will include the Chatham Islands.

This latest edition replaces the inaugural 2014 digital map of the same scale and is available on an 8 Gigabyte USB stick at $35 via the GNS Science webshop. https://shop.gns.cri.nz/maps/

The 2018 edition of the 1:250,000 digital Geological Map of New Zealand shown in an oblique view of the northern South Island. The most conspicuous change has involved the faults layer as many were reclassed as active when they ruptured during the 2016 Kaikoura earthquake.

The 2018 edition of the 1:250,000 digital Geological Map of New Zealand shown in an oblique view of the northern South Island. The most conspicuous change has involved the faults layer as many were reclassed as active when they ruptured during the 2016 Kaikoura earthquake.

The map can also be browsed online at no cost at https://data.gns.cri.nz/geology/

Geologist Mark Rattenbury of GNS Science said the updated version featured 15 layers of information that could be displayed on screen in any number of chosen combinations.

“It features much richer supporting information than the inaugural version and greater connectivity to related geoscience databases in New Zealand and internationally,” Dr Rattenbury said.

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This update underlines that geological maps are not static. All of our digital maps are updated as new information and new interpretations come to hand

Dr Mark Rattenbury

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The inclusion of new information compiled by geologists after the Kaikōura earthquake means that the northeast corner of the South Island is now one of the most up-to-date mapped parts of New Zealand.

As well as detailed information on the 22 faults that ruptured during the earthquake, the updated map shows a handful of previously unknown faults that showed up on LIDAR images acquired during post-quake reconnaissance.

“It also shows the recently exposed coastal platforms and coastal uplift along tens of kilometres of coastline, as well as about 50 of the largest landslides that mostly occurred inland from Kaikōura.

“This update underlines that geological maps are not static. All of our digital maps are updated as new information and new interpretations come to hand.” 

Dr Rattenbury said the map was used by a wide number of sectors including the insurance industry, the education sector, scientists, infrastructure providers, civil defence and emergency management operators, the tourism sector, and the public.