Slow-slip resources

GNS Science has been involved in the study of slow-slip earthquakes for many years. 
See below some resources that help to explain the phenomena and how it is measured.

What do these slow-slip events mean for future large earthquakes? 
GeoNet
This is an important, but difficult question that our experts here at GNS Science, along with Victoria University have been working on answering. The slow-slip events (or silent earthquakes) cover a large area of the plate boundary underneath the North Island and have made calculating the likelihood of future large aftershocks trickier. More here >> 

Slow slip events
GNS Science
More than a dozen slow slip events (also known as "silent" earthquakes) have been recorded in New Zealand between 2002 and 2012. Scientists have only been able to detect them recently due to the advent of global positioning system (GPS) equipment which can detect sub-centimetre changes in land movements. More here >>

Welcome to the subduction zone: how the Kaikoura 7.8 shock created a ‘silent earthquake’ 500km away, off Gisborne
23/11/2016 - The Spinoff 
A slow slip event off the east coast of the North Island, with an estimated equivalent impact of a M6.9 quake, was detected this week. GNS Science geophysicist Laura Wallace explains this important new area of seismic research, and what’s up with the Hikurangi subduction zone. More here >>

Slow Earthquakes Are a Thing
30/08/2016 The Smithsonian
On March 11, 2011, a magnitude 9.0 earthquake shook Japan for nearly six minutes, triggering a tsunami and a nuclear disaster that collectively killed nearly 20,000 people. But beneath the surface, the tectonic plates off the eastern coast of Japan had quietly started shifting long before the shaking began. More here >>
 

New findings help in understanding offshore quake threat
- 06/05/2016,  Press Release, GNS Science
Scientists have found that slow-motion earthquakes or ‘slow-slip events’ can rupture the shallow portion of a fault that also moves in large, tsunami-generating earthquakes. The discovery was made by conducting the world’s first detailed investigation of centimetre-level seafloor movement during a slow-slip event at the Hikurangi subduction zone off the North Island’s east coast. More here >>

Quake instruments to be retrieved after 12 months on the seafloor
- 17/06/2015, Press Release, GNS Science
Scientists from the United States, Japan, and New Zealand will retrieve instruments from the seafloor near Poverty Bay over the next two weeks as part of a project to measure earthquake activity and movement of the seafloor where the Pacific Plate is being thrust under or 'subducted' beneath the eastern North Island. More here >>

Unlocking the secrets of slow-slip events
- 06/10/2011,  Press Release, GNS Science
A three-year science project to decipher the low frequency ‘chatter’ that occurs several kilometres underground during ‘slow earthquakes’ under Poverty Bay has won funding from the prestigious Marsden Fund. More here >>

Cross section of the North Island of New Zealand showing how the Australian and Pacific Plates meet. The slow-slip events (orange-yellow patches) are superimposed onto the cross-section. Bottom right Insert shows a map view of the slow-slip events.

Cross section of the North Island of New Zealand showing how the Australian and Pacific Plates meet. The slow-slip events (orange-yellow patches) are superimposed onto the cross-section. Bottom right Insert shows a map view of the slow-slip events. Graphic by Darren D'Cruz, GNS Science.