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2010-2016 Canterbury earthquake sequence

Earthquake source modelling:

The Darfield (Canterbury, New Zealand) Mw7.1 earthquake of September 2010: a preliminary seismological report (Gledhill et al., 2011)

Figure 10: three major fault planes involved in the Darfield earthquake (Holden and Beavan, 2012)

Three major fault planes involved in the Darfield earthquake (Holden and Beavan, 2012)

  • Kinematic source model of the 22 February 2011 Mw 6.2 Christchurch Earthquake using strong motion data (Holden, 2011)
  • The character of accelerations in the Mw 6.2 Christchurch Earthquake (Fry, Benites and Kaiser, 2011)
  • The Mw 6.2 Christchurch Earthquake of February 2011: preliminary report (Kaiser et al., 2012)
  • Kinematic source studies of the ongoing (2010-2011) sequence of recent large earthquakes in Canterbury (Holden and Beavan, 2012)
  • The Pegasus Bay aftershock sequence of the Mw 7.1 Darfield (Canterbury), New Zealand earthquake (Ristau et al., 2013)
  • Quantification and numerical modelling of source, path, and site-specific effects in the Canterbury earthquakes (Kaiser et al., 2016).
  • The 2016 Valentine's Day Mw 5.7 Christchurch earthquake: preliminary report (Kaiser et al., 2016).
Figure 11: Peak ground accelerations recorded in Christchurch during the two largest earthquakes on 2011 December 23: (a) Mw 5.8 and (b) Mw 5.9. Data from the GeoNet national network are supplemented by a temporary array of low-cost accelerometers (Cochran et al. 2011). Note that not all strong motion stations returned recordings during both events (Ristau et al., 2013)

Peak ground accelerations recorded in Christchurch during the two largest earthquakes on 2011 December 23: (a) Mw 5.8 and (b) Mw 5.9. Data from the GeoNet national network are supplemented by a temporary array of low-cost accelerometers (Cochran et al. 2011). Note that not all strong motion stations returned recordings during both events (Ristau et al., 2013)

Ground motion modelling:

Ground motion modelling of the largest Mw 5.9+ aftershocks of the Canterbury 2010-2011 earthquake sequence (Holden and Kaiser, 2016)

Figure 12: Observed (black) and synthetic waveforms (15 seconds) of the Mw 5.9 December 23rd earthquake modelled at near-source stations for a reference rock site (blue) and using site-specific functions (red). Values near each waveform are peak ground accelerations in g.

Observed (black) and synthetic waveforms (15 seconds) of the Mw 5.9 December 23rd earthquake modelled at near-source stations for a reference rock site (blue) and using site-specific functions (red). Values near each waveform are peak ground accelerations in g (Holden and Kaiser, 2016).

Static and dynamic stress modelling

Dynamic stress triggering in the 2010-2011 Canterbury earthquake sequence (Caroline Holden, Charles Williams, David Rhoades); presented at Statseis 2017, (feb 20-24 Wellington, New Zealand) Stress triggering and the Canterbury earthquake sequence (Steacy et al., 2014)

Figure 13: Coulomb stress changes on 3D optimally oriented planes from a slip model which was available within 10 days of the Darfield earthquake. (see Stacey et al., 2014)

Coulomb stress changes on 3D optimally oriented planes from a slip model which was available within 10 days of the Darfield earthquake. (see Stacey et al., 2014)