White Island latest

Thermal infrared image taken on 15 January 2014, showing part of the Crater Lake (in the oval) and the area of the 2012 lava extrusion (in the large rectangular box). The small rectangle includes a hot fumarole on the southern edge of the Crater Lake. The temperatures given in the inset box relate to the different outlined areas and provide the minimum, maximum and average temperature with the marked area.

Thermal infrared image taken on 15 January 2014, showing part of the Crater Lake (in the oval) and the area of the 2012 lava extrusion (in the large rectangular box). The small rectangle includes a hot fumarole on the southern edge of the Crater Lake. The temperatures given in the inset box relate to the different outlined areas and provide the minimum, maximum and average temperature with the marked area.

VOLCANIC ALERT BULLETIN: WI – 2014/01
White Island Volcano
Volcanic Alert Level 1
Aviation Colour Code: Green
9.00 am Wednesday, 22 January 2014

Update of activity, Whakaari / White Island. Volcanic Alert Level remains at 1

No further eruptive activity has occurred at White Island (Whakaari) since the moderate eruption on the evening of October 11, 2013. Volcano seismic activity remains at a low levels, while the gas flux has been at elevated levels. The Crater Lake continues to grow.

GNS Science staff have made several visits to the island in the last week to assess the status of the volcano, repair existing monitoring installations and evaluate new portable equipment. The volcano remains in an elevated state of unrest.

The water level of the Crater Lake continues to rise. Observations and photographs suggest it is about 5 m higher than late last year. Average daily sulphur dioxide gas flux has ranged from 133 to 924 tonnes per day. This remains elevated compared to levels before 2012 when daily averages were generally less than 300 tonnes per day.

Experiments with a recently acquired thermal Infrared camera have enabled us to establish the lake surface temperature and the temperatures of several of the gas vents near the lava dome that was extruded in late 2012. This camera allows us to take images of the temperature of areas either from a helicopter or from the crater rim. The lake temperature ranged from 37 to 58 °C and averaged 51-52 °C. The temperature of the gas vents on the lava dome range from around 200 to 330 °C, and at one vent we have measured over 400 °C. These observations confirm hot volcanic gases are still passing through these vents.

Volcanologist Brad Scott said “This new camera gives us some fantastic data on the heat coming from the volcano and allows us to build a better picture of the status of the activity.”

We have also tested a Diode Laser instrument to evaluate carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide gas emissions and a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer which can measure a very wide range of different gases. We are developing our capabilities in monitoring different gases so that we can better understand how the volcano behaves.

White Island remains in a state of volcanic unrest. A range of eruptive activity can occur under these conditions and eruptions can start with little or no prior warning. Larger eruptions can eject mud and rocks and may impact the crater floor area. The Volcanic Alert Level remains at Level 1.

GNS Science is continuing to closely monitor the activity at White Island (and other New Zealand volcanoes) through the GeoNet project.

Contact:
Duty Volcanologist: Brad Scott
07 374 8211

The GeoNet project is funded by EQC and provides monitoring for all of New Zealand’s volcanoes.
http://www.geonet.org.nz/volcano/info/whiteisland

http://www.gns.cri.nz/Home/Learning/Science-Topics/Volcanoes/New-Zealand-Volcanoes/White-Island

White Island Crater Lake images from the west rim volcano camera, showing the changes in the Crater Lake size. The image on the left was taken at 4.50 pm on 17 December 2013, while the image on the right was taken at 2.30 pm on 19 January 2014. Note the edge of the lake in the foreground which indicates how the lake has increased in size. The red box outlines the area shown in the thermal infrared image below.

White Island Crater Lake images from the west rim volcano camera, showing the changes in the Crater Lake size. The image on the left was taken at 4.50 pm on 17 December 2013, while the image on the right was taken at 2.30 pm on 19 January 2014. Note the edge of the lake in the foreground which indicates how the lake has increased in size. The red box outlines the area shown in the thermal infrared image below.

VOLCANIC ALERT BULLETIN: WI – 2013/27
White Island Volcano
Volcanic Alert Level 1
Aviation Colour Code: Green
3:30 pm Monday, 23 December 2013

Update of activity, Whakaari / White Island. Volcanic Alert Level remains at 1

No further eruptive activity has occurred at White Island (Whakaari) since the moderate eruption on the evening of October 11, 2013. Seismic activity has remained at a low level since that eruption. Gas flux has been variable and the crater lake has re-established itself.

Average daily sulphur dioxide gas flux has ranged from 300 to over 1000 tonnes per day. This is elevated compared to levels before 2012 when daily averages were generally less than 300 tonnes per day.

There are now three webcams on White Island which enable us to keep a close eye on the crater lake and other areas of activity. The lake is now re-established and has drowned the vents that were active earlier this year.

Despite the seismic activity being at a low level, White Island remains in a state of volcanic unrest. A range of eruptive activity can occur under these conditions and eruptions can start with little or no prior warning. Larger eruptions can eject mud and rocks and may impact the crater floor area. The Volcanic Alert Level remains at Level 1.

GNS Science is continuing to closely monitor the activity at White Island (and other New Zealand volcanoes) through the GeoNet project.
Contact:
Duty Volcanologist: Mike Rosenberg
Volcano Information: Brad Scott

The GeoNet project is funded by EQC and provides monitoring for all of New Zealand’s volcanoes.
http://www.geonet.org.nz/volcano/info/whiteisland
http://www.gns.cri.nz/Home/Learning/Science-Topics/Volcanoes/New-Zealand-Volcanoes/White-Island

VOLCANIC ALERT BULLETIN: WI – 2013/26
Whakaari/White Island Volcano
Volcanic Alert Level: 1
Aviation Colour Code: Green
11:30 am Monday, 4 November 2013

Aviation Colour Code lowered to Green at Whakaari / White Island. Volcanic Alert Level remains at 1

No further eruptive activity has occurred at White Island (Whakaari) since the moderate eruption on the evening of October 11, 2013. Seismic activity and gas flux from the volcano have been at a low level since the eruption. The Aviation Colour Code has been lowered to Green from Yellow.

The potential impact of volcanic activity on aircraft has decreased and GNS Scientists have lowered the Aviation Colour Code to Green from Yellow. The Aviation Colour Codes are based on four colours and are intended for quick reference only in the international civil aviation community.

Despite the seismic activity and gas flux from the volcano being at a low level, White Island remains in a state of volcanic unrest with instability in the volcano-hydrothermal system. A range of eruptive activity can occur under these conditions. Eruptive activity can be expected with no prior warning. The larger eruptions can eject mud and rocks and may impact the crater floor area. The Volcanic Alert Level remains at Level 1.

GNS Science is continuing to closely monitor the activity at White Island (and other New Zealand volcanoes) through the GeoNet project.

The GeoNet project is funded by EQC and provides monitoring for all of New Zealand’s volcanoes.
http://www.geonet.org.nz/volcano/info/whiteisland
http://www.gns.cri.nz/Home/Learning/Science-Topics/Volcanoes/New-Zealand-Volcanoes/White-Island

VOLCANIC ALERT BULLETIN: WI – 2013/25
White Island Volcano (Whakaari)
Volcanic Alert Level lowered to Level 1
Aviation Colour Code: Yellow
2:30 pm Monday, 21 October 2013

White Island: Volcanic Alert Level lowered, Level 1

No further eruptive activity has occurred at White Island (Whakaari) since the moderate eruption on the evening of October 11. Volcano seismic activity has declined but remains variable. Gas flux remains high. Volcanic unrest continues at White Island. The Volcanic Alert Level has been lowered from Level 2 to Level 1. Aviation Colour Code remains at Yellow.

Since the moderate eruption on the evening of October 11 no further eruptions have been detected at White Island. A visit to examine and sample the effects of the eruption and repair damaged equipment has confirmed the entire Main Crater floor was affected. Ejecta extended to over 350 m from the active vent and a wet volcanic surge cloud enveloped the Main Crater, depositing a muddy layer.

Volcanic tremor levels decreased after the eruption on October 11 and have remained at variable levels since then. A successful gas flight was made on October 17. The SO2 flux was 450 tonnes per day, CO2 1140 tonnes per day and H2S 12 tonnes per day. The SO2 and H2S flux is little changed, CO2 has decreased from the previous measurements on 23 August. The gas data suggests that there is continuing degasing of a shallow body of magma (molten material). The daily SO2 measurements from data logging equipment on the island show the SO2 flux has ranged from 408 to 1400 tonnes per day over the last week and the average flux remains elevated.

White Island remains in a state of volcanic unrest with instability in the volcano-hydrothermal system. A range of eruptive activity can occur under these conditions with little or no prior warning. The larger eruptions can eject mud and rocks and may impact the crater floor area.

GNS Science is continuing to closely monitor the activity at White Island (and other New Zealand volcanoes) through the GeoNet project, and will provide more information as it becomes available.

The Volcanic Alert Level ranges from 0 to 5 and defines the current status at a volcano. Level 1 indicates signs of volcanic unrest.
Aviation Colour Codes are based on four colours and are intended for quick reference only in the international civil aviation community.

The GeoNet project is funded by EQC and provides monitoring for all of New Zealand’s volcanoes.
http://www.geonet.org.nz/volcano/info/whiteisland
http://www.gns.cri.nz/Home/Learning/Science-Topics/Volcanoes/New-Zealand-Volcanoes/White-Island

VOLCANIC ALERT BULLETIN: WI – 2013/24
White Island Volcano
Volcanic Alert Level 2
Aviation Colour Code: Down from Orange to Yellow
1:45 pm Monday, 14 October 2013

White Island activity update

Volcanic unrest continues at White Island. Following the moderate eruption that occurred on the evening of Friday 11 October the tremor level has declined, although the potential for further eruptions with little or no warning remains. The Aviation Colour Code has been lowered from Orange to Yellow but the Volcanic Alert Level remains at 2.

Volcanic tremor levels gradually decreased after the eruption on Friday and are now at levels equivalent to the middle of last week. Measurements of sulphur dioxide gas emissions from the last week show an increase in gas levels towards the end of the week with a maximum of over 1000 t/d of sulphur dioxide measured on 11 October. This is one of the highest values that we have measured since June last year.

Video compilation from the web camera on the Crater Floor shows the activity on Friday evening with a rapidly expanding ash cloud moving towards the camera. The video clip can be seen at: http://youtu.be/7YuOFddVGwc
Note times in video clips are in Universal time (13 hours behind local time).

The photos below from the crater rim camera show the effects of the eruption with one image from the day before the eruption and one image from the morning afterwards. Note how the dark grey mud coats the crater floor and crater walls. The eruption was larger than
previous events over the last year, in terms of the area impacted by mud, and would have been life threatening if there had been people on the island.

A range of eruptive activity has occurred over the last 15 months, with more frequent events in the last couple of weeks. Eruptive activity can be expected with no prior warning. The larger eruptions can eject mud and rocks and may impact the crater floor area where visitors to the island are located.

GNS Science is continuing to closely monitor the activity at White Island (and other New Zealand volcanoes) through the GeoNet project, and will provide more information as it becomes available.
Contact:
Volcano Information: Brad Scott
Duty Volcanologist: Gill Jolly
07 374 8211

Images from White Island web cam

VOLCANIC ALERT BULLETIN: WI – 2013/23
White Island Volcano
Volcanic Alert Level 2
Aviation Colour Code: Orange
12:00 PM Saturday, 12 October 2013

White Island Activity and Alert Level change

A moderate explosive eruption occurred at White Island at approximately 8:09 PM NZST last night. The eruption lasted about 1 minute based on data from acoustic and seismic sensors, and was confirmed by subsequent analysis of web camera images during daylight hours. As a consequence of this activity the Volcanic Alert Level is now raised to Level 2 and the Aviation Colour Code to Orange

Observations from the web cameras show an explosive eruption producing an ash cloud column that expanded across the Main Crater floor. New mud deposited on the crater floor is evident in the web camera images from the crater rim this morning. The present activity is a continuation of the unrest observed at White Island for the past 15 months and hazardous eruptions of this type may occur with no warning. This eruption is larger than recent events and would have been life threatening to people on the island.

We will provide more information as it becomes available.
Volcanic Alert Level has changed from Level 1 to Level 2
Aviation Colour Code has changed from Yellow to Orange

VOLCANIC ALERT BULLETIN: WI – 2013/20
White Island Volcano
Volcanic Alert Level 1
Aviation Colour Code: Yellow
15:00 Monday, 26 August 2013

White Island Remains Quiet

White Island remains quiet since erupting briefly on 20 August. A spike in sulphur dioxide gas emission that accompanied the eruption has passed and gas flux has returned to pre-eruption levels. Seismic activity, which dropped after the eruption, remains low. The Volcanic Alert Level remains at 1 and the Aviation Colour Code at Yellow.

Observations by GNS science volcanologists flying over White Island on Friday last week showed that the crater that erupted on 20 August had become drowned as water had risen to reform a small lake that previously existed in the area. The area that erupted has been conspicuous for a lack of steaming since the eruption, particularly since the small lake reformed. Volcanic gas flux measurements last Friday showed that, as well as sulphur dioxide, carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulphide were also at pre-eruption levels.

The processes that caused last week's eruption are yet not fully understood. While the eruptive activity at White Island is currently at a low level, eruptions similar to those experienced last week or smaller eruptions seen more frequently over the past year are possible with no prior warning. The larger eruptions can eject mud and rocks and may impact the crater floor area where visitors to the island may be.

GNS Science continues to closely monitor the activity at White Island and other New Zealand volcanoes through the GeoNet project. The next bulletin will be issued if there is a change in activity or there are new observations.

Contact: Volcano Information: Brad Scott
Duty Volcanologist: Steven Sherburn
07 374 8211

The Volcanic Alert Level ranges from 0 to 5 and defines the current status at a volcano. Level 1 indicates signs of volcanic unrest.
Aviation Colour Codes are based on four colours and are intended for quick reference only in the international civil aviation community.
The GeoNet project is funded by EQC and provides monitoring for all of New Zealand’s volcanoes.

http://www.geonet.org.nz/volcano/info/whiteisland
http://www.gns.cri.nz/Home/Learning/Science-Topics/Volcanoes/New-Zealand-Volcanoes/White-Island

VOLCANIC ALERT BULLETIN: WI – 2013/19
White Island Volcano
Volcanic Alert Level 1
Aviation Colour Code: Yellow
13:00 Wednesday, 21st August 2013

Volcanic Alert Level down to 1 at White Island

Following the lower level of activity at White Island since yesterday’s eruption, GNS Science has lowered the Volcanic Alert Level to 1 (from 2) and the Aviation Colour Code to Yellow (from Orange).

White Island 20/08/2013

The level of volcanic activity at White Island has decreased substantially since yesterday’s eruption. Steam and gas continue to be emitted from the active crater, in a similar fashion to that prior to the eruption. The GeoNet monitoring network continues to record seismic activity, as expected from a volcano that has been experiencing unrest for over a year.
GNS volcanologist Agnes Mazot said: “We are planning to fly around the White island and take airborne measurements of the amount of gas being emitted from the volcano. The weather is not cooperating at the moment and will are aiming at a flight possibly on Friday”.

Although the activity at White Island is currently at a low level, eruptions similar to those experienced over the past year are possible with no prior warning. These include mud geysering, more energetic eruptions similar to yesterday’s event, or ash from the active vents. Such eruptions can eject mud and rocks and may impact the crater floor area where visitors to the island may be.

There is presently no clear indication that yesterday’s eruption is leading to a large eruption, but eruptions similar to those in the last year cannot be excluded over the days or weeks to come.

The Volcanic Alert Level is now at 1 and the Aviation Colour Code at Yellow.

GNS Science continues to closely monitor the activity at White Island and other New Zealand volcanoes through the GeoNet project. The next bulletin will be issued if there is a change in activity.

The Volcanic Alert Level ranges from 0 to 5 and defines the current status at a volcano. Level 1 indicates signs of volcanic unrest.
Aviation Colour Codes are based on four colours and are intended for quick reference only in the international civil aviation community.

The GeoNet project is funded by EQC and provides monitoring for all of New Zealand’s volcanoes.
http://www.geonet.org.nz/volcano/info/whiteisland
http://www.gns.cri.nz/Home/Learning/Science-Topics/Volcanoes/New-Zealand-Volcanoes/White-Island

VOLCANIC ALERT BULLETIN: WI – 2013/17
White Island Volcano
Volcanic Alert Level 2
Aviation Colour Code: Orange
14:00 Tuesday, 20th August 2013

White Island Eruption Information Update – Alert remains at 2, Aviation Colour Code lowered to Orange from Red

A small eruption occurred at White Island at 10:23 on Tuesday 20 August 2013 (NZ local time) and continued for about 10 minutes. The eruption column was visible from the Bay of Plenty coast with a plume rising to about 4 km above sea level before slowly dispersing.

The activity at White Island has now returned to that before this morning's eruption.

The eruption originated in the active crater area that has been experiencing very small mud eruptions in recent weeks. The eruption threw mud and rocks a short distance from the source, and produced large volumes of white steam. Weather radar observations show that a small proportion of volcanic ash was carried with the steam.

White Island has been experiencing low level activity since August 2012 so an eruption like that this morning was not completely unexpected. Volcanologists observed a short period of strong volcanic tremor yesterday morning, but is is not clear if this was related to this morning's eruption.

The hazards posed by an eruption like that this morning are restricted to anyone on White Island or possibly anchored nearby in a boat. Anyone living in the Bay of Plenty is not at risk.

Duty Volcanologist Nico Fournier said “It is too soon for any kind of prediction of activity in the next few days. Given the low level of activity over the last year we are watching carefully and would not be surprised if there were further eruptions in the next few days”.

A futher update will be issued on Wednesday morning unless there is a substantial change in activity before then.
The Volcanic Alert Level ranges from 0 to 5 and defines the current status at a volcano. Level 1 indicates signs of volcanic unrest.

VOLCANIC ALERT BULLETIN: WI – 2013/16
White Island Volcano
Volcanic Alert Level 2
Aviation Colour Code: Red
11:10 Tuesday, 20th August 2013

White Island erupted – Alert raised to 2 from 1, Aviation Colour Code raised to Red from Green

A small eruption occurred at White Island at 10:23 on Tuesday 20 August 2013 (NZ local time). The eruption appears to have continued for about 10 minutes and mainly produced steam.

More information will be available in a follow-up bulletin.

The Volcanic Alert Level ranges from 0 to 5 and defines the current status at a volcano. Level 1 indicates signs of volcanic unrest.
Aviation Colour Codes are based on four colours and are intended for quick reference only in the international civil aviation community.

The GeoNet project is funded by EQC and provides monitoring for all of New Zealand’s volcanoes.
http://www.geonet.org.nz/volcano/info/whiteisland
http://www.gns.cri.nz/Home/Learning/Science-Topics/Volcanoes/New-Zealand-Volcanoes/White-Island

VOLCANIC ALERT BULLETIN: WI – 2013/15
White Island Volcano
Volcanic Alert Level 1
Aviation Colour Code: Green
12:00 midday Monday, 5th August 2013

White Island Minor Activity Declines
Aviation Colour Code lowered to Green

GNS Science says that minor activity in White Island’s main crater has now declined.

The Volcano Alert Level remains at Level 1 but the Aviation Colour Code has been lowered to Green.

The bursts of steam, gas and mud clearly seen last week are no longer visible through the volcano cameras. Volcanic tremor that was high at the end of last week has now decreased to near-background levels.

The potential for larger, more explosive eruptions that might impact on visitors to the island is always present. Any larger eruptions may occur with no warning to any visitors to the island.

The ultimate outcome of the current activity at White Island remains unclear and GNS Science continues to closely monitor White Island through the GeoNet project.

Background
Unrest at White Island began in July 2012 and lead to explosive eruptions and ash emissions in August. A small lava extrusion in the main crater occurred in November, followed by phreatic, steam driven activity in December which continued through January and February 2013. Very minor ash emissions have been interspersed throughout this eruption sequence as conditions within the craters have changed.

The Volcanic Alert Level ranges from 0 to 5 and defines the current status at a volcano. Level 1 indicates signs of volcanic unrest.
Aviation Colour Codes are based on four colours and are intended for quick reference only in the international civil aviation community.

The GeoNet project is funded by EQC and provides monitoring for all of New Zealand’s volcanoes.

http://www.geonet.org.nz/volcano/info/whiteisland
http://www.gns.cri.nz/Home/Learning/Science-Topics/Volcanoes/New-Zealand-Volcanoes/White-Island
Contact: Brad Scott 07 374 8211
Duty Volcanologist, Michael Rosenberg

VOLCANIC ALERT BULLETIN: WI – 2013/14
6 pm Friday, 26 July 2013

VOLCANIC ALERT BULLETIN: WI – 2013/13
1 pm Monday, 29 April 2013

VOLCANIC ALERT BULLETIN: WI – 2013/12
3 pm Tuesday, 26 March 2013

VOLCANIC ALERT BULLETIN: WI – 2013/11
4pm Monday, 4 March 2013

VOLCANIC ALERT BULLETIN: WI – 2013/10
4pm Monday, 25 February 2013

VOLCANIC ALERT BULLETIN: WI – 2013/8
1:30 pm Monday, 11 February 2013

VOLCANIC ALERT BULLETIN: WI – 2013/7
5 pm Thursday, 31 January 2013

VOLCANIC ALERT BULLETIN: WI – 2013/6
11.30 am Wednesday, 30 January 2013

VOLCANIC ALERT BULLETIN: WI – 2013/5
1pm Tuesday, 29 January 2013

VOLCANIC ALERT BULLETIN: WI – 2013/4
5pm Friday, 25 January 2013

VOLCANIC ALERT BULLETIN: WI – 2013/3
4pm Thursday, 24 January 2013

VOLCANIC ALERT BULLETIN: WI – 2013/2
10am Tuesday, 22 January 2013

White Island 25/02/2013

White Island 25/02/2013